Gift of Nutrition

Gift of Nutrition
December 7, 2016 Jenna Easterling

100wishesposter-web

 

Merry Christmas from Lori and the staff at S4L,
This article is about nutrition for kids. I wanted to explain a little bit about the message of the nervous system through the gift of food. What childhood memories do you have about Christmas? Do you remember the smell of fresh baked goods coming from the kitchen? Do you remember how making a turkey and stuffing dinner for family and friends made you feel like everything was hopeful and joyous?
The neural net is created inside of the brain by connecting memories to the sensory nerves. We have five of them they are the gift of smell, taste, touch, sight, and hearing. As children, we use these gifts as a way to connect every day life to a memory from the past. A way to keep connecting new pathways is to remember memories by closing your eyes and thinking about time spent with a family member or a friend that are connected to one or more of these sensory nerves. During this season of plenty remember to spread the gift of connected memories with those around whether it is to give great food to another family or to invite a group of new friends to come sit around your table for a time of memory building moments.
As a suggestion for now and into the New Year;
Don’t forget to hydrate during this season because the stress that accompanies this holiday season can be abated by simply staying hydrated.
You can not grow a powerful body without proper hydration.
The tips below are pulled from information on serval websites and from my own training if you need further information please feel free to give us a call.

1) Protein helps a child’s body build cells, break down food into energy, fight infection, and carry oxygen. Foods that contain high levels of protein include:

Meat
Poultry
Fish
Eggs
Nuts
2) Carbohydrates

While the latest diet trend is to “cut the carbs,” carbohydrates are actually the body’s most important source of energy. They help a child’s body to use fat and protein for building and repairing tissue. Carbohydrates come in several different forms (sugars, starches, and fiber), but kids should be eating more of the starches and simple sugars. Foods that contain high levels of carbohydrates include:

Breads
Rice
Crackers
Pasta
Potatoes
Beans
Fruits
Vegetable

 

3) Fats
Fats that mainly come from animal sources of food, such as red meat, poultry and full-fat dairy products. Look for ways to have a variety of fats with vegetable and nut oils, which provides essential fatty acids and vitamin E. Healthier fats are also naturally present in olives, nuts, avocados and seafood. Limit trans fats by avoiding foods that contain partially hydrogenated oil.
If you have questions about nutrition for kids or specific concerns about your child’s diet, talk to your child’s doctor or a registered dietitian, also at Stretch 4 Life we have two therapist that are trained in nutrition to aid with information.
Fats are a great source of energy for kids and are easily stored in a child’s body. They are also important in helping the body to properly use some of the other nutrients it needs. Foods that contain high levels of fats include:

Whole-milk dairy products
Cooking oils
Meat
Fish
Nuts

 

4) Calcium is essential in helping to build a child’s healthy bones and teeth. It’s also important for blood clotting and for nerve, muscle, and heart function. Foods that contain high levels of calcium include:

Milk
Cheeses
Yogurt
Butter
Berries
(Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, and more)
Ice cream
Egg yolks
Broccoli
Spinach

 

5) Iron is necessary for a child to build healthy blood that carries oxygen to cells all over the body. Foods that contain high levels of iron include:

Red meats
Liver
Molasses
Poultry
Shellfish
Whole grains
Beans
Nuts
Fruit (dried)

 

6) Folate, necessary for soon-to-be moms, is also very important for kids. One of the B vitamins, folate is necessary for healthy growth and development of a child’s cells. Lack of this vitamin can cause anemia. Foods that contain high levels of folate include:

Whole-grain granola
Lentils
Chickpeas
Asparagus
Spinach
Black or kidney beans
Brussels sprouts
Fruit

 

7) Fiber helps produce bowel regularity in a child. It can also play a role in reducing the chances of heart disease and cancer later in life. Foods that contain high levels of fiber include

Chickpeas
Lentils
Kidney beans
Seeds
Nut
Lettuce
Spinach
Turnips
Radishes
Dried Fruits
Whole grain breads
8) Vitamin A serves a variety of purposes in kids and adults. It helps growth, assists the eyes in adjusting to dim and bright lights, keeps skin healthy, and works to prevent infection. Foods that contain high levels of Vitamin A include:

Carrots, Sweet potatoes, Squash, Apricots, Spinach, Broccoli, Cabbage, Fish oils, Eggs
9) Vitamin C does more than just fighting off the common cold. It also holds the body’s cells together, strengthens the walls of blood vessels, helps the body heal wounds, and is important for building strong bones and teeth. Foods that contain high levels of vitamin C:
Fruits
Vegetable

Nutrition for kids is based on the same principles as nutrition for adults. Everyone needs the same types of nutrients — such as vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, protein and fat. Children, however, need different amounts of specific nutrients at different ages.

So what’s the best formula to fuel your child’s growth and development? Check out these nutrition basics for girls and boys at various ages, based on the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Ages 4 to 8: Daily guidelines for girls
Hydration of a water needs to be 6 to 8 cups ( measuring cup )
Calories 1,200-1,800, depending on growth and activity level
Protein 3-5 ounces
Fruits 1-1.5 cups
Vegetables 1.5-2.5 cups
Grains 4-6 ounces
Dairy 2.5 cups
Ages 4 to 8: Daily guidelines for boys
Hydration of a water needs to be 6 to 8 cups ( 1 cup = 8 oz )
Calories 1,200-2,000, depending on growth and activity level
Protein 3-5.5 ounces
Fruits 1-2 cups
Vegetables 1.5-2.5 cups
Grains 4-6 ounces
Dairy 2.5 cups
Ages 9 to 13: Daily guidelines for girls
Hydration of a water needs to be 80 to 120 ozs
Calories 1,400-2,200, depending on growth and activity level
Protein 4-6 ounces
Fruits 1.5-2 cups
Vegetables 1.5-3 cups
Grains 5-7 ounces
Dairy 3 cups
Ages 9 to 13: Daily guidelines for boys
Hydration of a water needs to be 80 to 120 ozs
Calories 1,600-2,600, depending on growth and activity level
Protein 5-6.5 ounces
Fruits 1.5-2 cups
Vegetables 2-3.5 cups
Grains 5-9 ounces
Dairy 3 cups
Ages 14 to 18: Daily guidelines for girls
Hydration of a water needs to be 128 ozs
Calories 1,800-2,400, depending on growth and activity level
Protein 5-6.5 ounces
Fruits 1.5-2 cups
Vegetables 2.5-3 cups
Grains 6-8 ounces
Dairy 3 cups
Ages 14 to 18: Daily guidelines for boys
Hydration of a water needs to be 128 ozs
Calories 2,000-3,200, depending on growth and activity level
Protein 5.5-7 ounces
Fruits 2-2.5 cups
Vegetables 2.5-4 cups
Grains 6-10 ounces
Dairy 4 cups
Sources: The Nemours Foundation; National Network for Child Care; Meals That Heal for Babies, Toddlers, and Children (Pocket Books, 1996); U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The information in this article is designed for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for informed health care providers advice or care. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting your pediatrician or family doctor. Please consult your health care professional with any questions or concerns you might have regarding your or your child’s condition.